Sylvester Stallone’s Art Exhibitions in Europe

Images http://bit.ly/1K2zHRq

http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-24693264

http://www.inquisitr.com/2098798/sylvester-stallone-exhibits-paintings-at-museum-in-france/

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3102757/Sylvester-Stallone-takes-inspiration-paintings-sell-120-000-Rambos-subconsciousness.html

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jimdobson/2015/05/23/sylvester-stallone-the-artist-launches-real-love-exhibit-in-france/

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/jonathanjonesblog/2013/oct/28/sylvester-stallone-art-rocky-paintings

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/art/11636202/Sylvester-Stallone-not-your-average-Hollywood-painter.html

http://edition.cnn.com/2013/11/04/travel/stallone-art-exhibition/

http://uk.blastingnews.com/showbiz-tv/2015/05/sylvester-stallone-s-art-is-honored-with-an-exhibit-in-nice-00415939.html

http://www.cntraveler.com/stories/2013-10-31/sylvester-stallone-art-exhibit-russian-museum-st-petersburg

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Artists Call For Entries | SUBMIT NOW

Pure Arts Group is a marketing and PR Agency founded in 2009 by FAD writer Lesley Samms.

Internationally renowned for discovering, mentoring and supporting talent in contemporary art. Submissions are now invited for 2015/2016 selection.

Open to all fine art disciplines including painting, original print, mixed media, sculpture, ceramics, glass, textiles, installation, film and photography.

Pure annually select 60 artists to exhibit with them, however, all submitting artists become a member for the year, whether selected to exhibit or not.

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JUDGES

Antony Penrose – Director Lee Miller Archive

Ryan Stanier – Fair Director The Other Art Fair

Linda Salway – HO Creative Arts Development Eastbourne College

Jennifer West – Director Gallery North

ANNUAL AWARDS

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WHAT ARTISTS SAY ABOUT PURE

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Lichen on Hawthorne Elan Valley 2014 | Louisa Crispin 

Winning the Pure Drawing Prize was a huge endorsement of the path I had chosen to follow. Subsequent mentoring by Lesley Samms and networking with other Pure Artists has given me the confidence to develop my practice and successfully approach the London market with the knowledge of their continuing support in the background.

Louisa Crispin AUA

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Bridging the Void Film Still

The Bridging the Void 2015 tour has finished and was an unbelievable success, with 4 out of the 7 venues selling out. Thank you for your help. You have been a wonderful support and I would be grateful to continue the partnership.

Rachel Johnson | Choreographer & Film Artist

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All That Remains | Helen Acklam 
Entering the Pure Arts Group Open Submission in 2013 has proved to be a pivotal time for me and for my career as a painter. Most importantly, exhibiting with Pure Arts and winning an award was a real boost to my self-confidence as an artist. Following on from that, I had the chance to exhibit in Group Shows which then led to commissions and further sales. The Pure Arts team have consistently been supportive, giving me very useful and practical feedback on my work and helped me to develop my website. Another real benefit has been the chance to get to know other Pure Arts members and gain what feels more like friendships than professional relationships!
Helen Acklam | Painter

SUBMISSIONS CLOSE MIDNIGHT 3rd JULY 2015

ENTER ONLINE | pureartsgroup.co.uk purefineart.org.uk

About Lesley Samms

Lesley Samms – Art consultant, curator, writer. Lesley has a background in finance, having spent the early part of her career working in the City of London. For the past 25 years she has worked primarily in the Contemporary Fine Art Marketplace. She is passionate about the arts and is the founder and driving force behind PURE Arts Group, a creative marketing and pr agency. PURE is internationally recognised as a key player in contemporary art; discovering, mentoring and supporting emerging talent

ART

Artists Call For Entries | SUBMIT NOW

ARTIST OPPORTUNITY: Pure Arts Group Call For Entries | SUBMIT NOW

Pure Arts Group is a marketing and PR Agency founded in 2009 by FAD writer Lesley Samms.

Internationally renowned for discovering, mentoring and supporting talent in contemporary art. Submissions are now invited for 2015/2016 selection.

Open to all fine art disciplines including painting, original print, mixed media, sculpture, ceramics, glass, textiles, installation, film and photography.

Pure annually select 60 artists to exhibit with them, however, all submitting artists become a member for the year, whether selected to exhibit or not.

JUDGES

Antony Penrose – Director Lee Miller Archive

Ryan Stanier – Fair Director The Other Art Fair

Linda Salway – HO Creative Arts Development Eastbourne College

Jennifer West – Director Gallery North

ANNUAL AWARDS

DSCF9246 1024x680 ARTIST OPPORTUNITY: Pure Arts Group Call For Entries | SUBMIT NOW

£2,000 Prize Fund

Exhibitions & Events Professional Development Mentoring

WHAT ARTISTS SAY ABOUT PURE

Louisa Crispin 1 1024x380 ARTIST OPPORTUNITY: Pure Arts Group Call For Entries | SUBMIT NOW

Lichen on Hawthorne Elan Valley 2014 | Louisa Crispin 

Winning the Pure Drawing Prize was a huge endorsement of the path I had chosen to follow. Subsequent mentoring by Lesley Samms and networking with other Pure Artists has given me the confidence to develop my practice and successfully approach the London market with the knowledge of their continuing support in the background.

Louisa Crispin AUA

Bridging the void 1024x729 ARTIST OPPORTUNITY: Pure Arts Group Call For Entries | SUBMIT NOW

Bridging the Void Film Still

The Bridging the Void 2015 tour has finished and was an unbelievable success, with 4 out of the 7 venues selling out. Thank you for your help. You have been a wonderful support and I would be grateful to continue the partnership.

Rachel Johnson | Choreographer & Film Artist

Helen Acklam Afterwards 1 ARTIST OPPORTUNITY: Pure Arts Group Call For Entries | SUBMIT NOW

All That Remains | Helen Acklam 
Entering the Pure Arts Group Open Submission in 2013 has proved to be a pivotal time for me and for my career as a painter. Most importantly, exhibiting with Pure Arts and winning an award was a real boost to my self-confidence as an artist. Following on from that, I had the chance to exhibit in Group Shows which then led to commissions and further sales. The Pure Arts team have consistently been supportive, giving me very useful and practical feedback on my work and helped me to develop my website. Another real benefit has been the chance to get to know other Pure Arts members and gain what feels more like friendships than professional relationships!
Helen Acklam | Painter

SUBMISSIONS CLOSE MIDNIGHT 3rd JULY 2015

ENTER ONLINE | pureartsgroup.co.uk purefineart.org.uk

About Lesley Samms

Lesley Samms – Art consultant, curator, writer. Lesley has a background in finance, having spent the early part of her career working in the City of London. For the past 25 years she has worked primarily in the Contemporary Fine Art Marketplace. She is passionate about the arts and is the founder and driving force behind PURE Arts Group, a creative marketing and pr agency. PURE is internationally recognised as a key player in contemporary art; discovering, mentoring and supporting emerging talent

How to Think About Conceptual Art

How to Think About Conceptual Art

By Blair Asbury Brooks

Sept. 25, 2014

How to Think About Conceptual Art

Joseph Kosuth’s One and Three Chairs

There has been a lot of bickering about what Conceptual art is/was; who began it; who did what when with it; what its goals, philosophy, and politics were and might have been. I was there, but I dont trust my memory. I dont trust anyone elses either.  – Lucy Lippard, “Escape Attempts”

The term “concept art” was coined by Henry Flynt in a 1961 essay to describe “an art of which the material is ‘concepts,’” going on to state that, “concept art proper will involve language.” Was this new term known to the artist practitioners of the time themselves? Curator and writer Lucy Lippard thinks not in her essay “Escape Attempts,” adding that Flynt’s term was “in any case a different kind of ‘concept’—less formal, less rooted in the subversion of art-world assumptions and art-as-commodity.” To Lippard, the term conceptual art means “work in which the idea is paramount and the material form is secondary, lightweight, ephemeral, cheap, unpretentious and/or ‘dematerialized.’” Lippard does not deny conceptual art material form (yes, it can even involve paint) and by stressing the importance of the “idea,” she keeps conceptual art open to language-based work.

“The label conceptual art is simplistic and misleading,” art dealer, curator, and writer Seth Siegelaub said of conceptual art during a 1973 interview with Michael Claura for the French magazine XXe siècle. After decrying the impossibility of categorizing so many artists under one umbrella, Seigelaub allows that “a global description would be that these artists are engaged in an art whose principal characteristic is the predominant use of language.” He went on to elaborate that, “in a certain sense, conceptual art could be defined” as:

                                       Painting                                        The Novel
_______                                        _________
Conceptual Art                                   Journalism

Sol LeWitt wrote “Paragraphs on Conceptual Art” for Artforum in 1967 and, like Lippard, focused on the “idea”: “What the work of art looks like isn’t too important. It has to look like something if it has physical form. No matter what form it may finally have it must begin with an idea. It is the process of conception and realization with which the artist is concerned.” Of course, he added, “Conceptual Art is only good when the idea is good.”

Others attempt to break it down further. “Generally speaking, it may be in one of four forms,” explains Tony Godfrey in his survey on conceptual art—namely: the readymade, intervention, documentation, or words.

Does anyone agree on what exactly conceptual art is? Not in absolute terms, but that’s kind of the point. That Lippard and Siegelaub—two of conceptual art’s most important proponents—have differing parameters for it hints to the movement’s subversive intentions.

BEGINNINGS

Conceptual art developed partly as an adverse reaction to Modernism, specifically to the formalist strictures hammered in by Clement Greenberg, who championed flat abstract painting. Minimalism also fought Greenberg’s orthodoxy at the same time as conceptual art—by rejecting the Modernist idea of painting and instead working with industrial materials—but contained the dialogue within the gallery system. Conceptual art sought to work outside of the gallery and the art world.

Marcel Duchamp is an oft-mentioned precursor to conceptual art, particularly in regards to his readymades, like Bottle Rack (1914) or Fountain (1917), which questioned both the monetary value placed on art as well as the aesthetic judgement. Duchamp also initiated the focus on documentation over the “final” artwork by, in 1934, exhibiting his notes and photographs for his The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (Large Glass) (1915-23) as artworks in their own right.

Early conceptual works were not only in the visual arts but also in music, most significantly John Cage’s 433 (1952), in which the performer sits at the piano for four minutes and 33 seconds in the silence of the room.  There is, of course, no “silence” but rather, Cage’s reliance (expectation) of the audience’s participation in listening. The importance of the viewer/audience as participant—that only through that participation could a work exist—became a tenet of conceptual art.

DESTRUCTION

It was through Cage’s contemporary, Robert Rauschenberg’s Erased de Kooning Drawing, 1953, that art historian Leo Steinberg, “suddenly understood that the fruit of an artist’s work need not be an object.”

Conceptual creation through destruction was also utilized by John Latham in 1966 when he (along with the artist Barry Flanagan) chew up pages of a library copy of Greenberg’s anthologized essays, Art and Culture, only to return the masticated texts to the St. Martins School of Art library in vials years later. Another example is John Baldessari’s 1970 Cremation Project, in which he destroyed his paintings made between May 1953 and March 1966 at a crematorium, producing cookies out of the ashes, which were accompanied by documentation.

DOCUMENTATION

The use of documentation of artistic processes as artworks in and of themselves was a foundational conceit of conceptual art. For what many consider to be the first conceptual art exhibition, Mel Bochner curated a show at the School of Visual Arts in 1966 titled “Working Drawings and Other Visible Things on Paper Not Necessarily Meant to Be Viewed as Art” in which he presented xeroxed copies of papers submitted by other artists in binders that he set on plinths in the middle of the gallery. While proclaiming the non-artness of the documents, Bochner presented his non-art in traditional gallery fashion in order to challenge the perceptions of what constitutes art, exactly. If something is presented as art in a gallery setting, deals directly with art, but is declared by its presenter to not be art, is it art?

BOOKS AND MAGAZINES

As early as 1962, Los Angeles artist Ed Ruscha published his Twenty-Six Gasoline Stations. The conceptual work was a book comprised of black-and-white photographs of 26 gas stations. It was not a precious artist’s book, and the photographs did not exist as art apart from the book. The unglamorous, mass-produced (the first printing was an edition of 400) book was the artwork.

Other early moments in conceptual art also utilized mass-produced publications, particularly arts magazines. In 1966, Mel Bochner, along with Robert Smithson, made the first “magazine intervention” piece. A response to gallerists requesting reproductions of artwork instead of taking the time to visit the artists’ studios and see the work itself, “The Domain of the Great Bear” (Fall 1966, Art Voices)—an eight-page fictional account of an artwork created in the Hayden Planetarium—was intended to bypass the galleries and exist solely as a reproduction. The intention was subversive or, as Bochner has written, “to plant an intellectual time bomb inside the art system’s machinery.”

Currently best known for his pavilions, Dan Graham also used magazine intervention. His Homes for America (1966-67) used the ephemerality and simultaneously mass-produced/audience-specific qualities of an arts magazine as his medium.

LANGUAGE

It has been said that conceptual art was an approach for the thinking artist. Proof of this is the quantity—and highly analytic quality—of writing on conceptual art by the so-called “Conceptual Artists” themselves (not that any of them accepted the label—except for Joseph Kosuth). It makes sense therefore, that many early conceptual works were indeed language-based.

An influential collective of English artists, Art & Language was started in Coventry, England, in 1968 by Terry Atkinson, David Bainbridge, Michael Baldwin, and Harold Hurrell as a journal of conceptual art. The intention was, as art historian Thomas Crow explains in The Rise of the Sixties, “to create the necessary intellectual framework in which their ambitions could be understood, even if this mean suspending the actual making of art for the duration.” Kosuth became the American editor of Art & Language in the ’70s. The group somewhat disbanded in the late ’70s, although it continues today with Baldwin and Ramsden and now includes traditional media.

Language as medium also allowed for new approaches to painting and sculpture, and Lawrence Weiner famously uses works as the medium for his sculptures, which require the participation of the viewer to be realized in thought.

Painting did exist within certain conceptual practices beginning in the late ’50s and ’60s, notably in the work of the late On Kawara, whose “date” painting simply consist of the calendar date of the work’s execution painted on canvas, rendered in the language of the place it was made. If the work was not completed by the midnight of the day it was begun, it was destroyed. In “Art After Philosophy,” Kosuth described Kawara’s use of paint as “a pun on the morphological characteristics of traditional art, rather than an interest in painting ‘proper.’”

BEYOND THE U.S. AND U.K.

Many important Conceptual art practitioners were in Europe, like Yves Klein in France and Piero Manzoni in Italy was before their untimely deaths. (Fun note: Manzoni began to “sign” people as art of his practice, one signee being artist Marcel Broodthaers).

Jan Dibbets and Reiner Ruthenbeck (who was a student of Joseph Beuys’s at the Düsseldorf Academy) made innovations in the used and disjointing of image and text.

Other artists, like Daniel Buren, used interventions. For Buren this meant placing pieces of  paper with painted stripes 8.7 cm wide, alternating white and a color, in various locales inside and outside. A practice he continued for years, “without any evolution or way out.”

PERFORMANCE

Intervention could also relate to the performance elements of conceptual art—and their blurring of public/private space and viewer/participant—which in turn related to the early “Happenings” (Allan Kaprow coined the term “Happenings” which he first staged in 1959) and early Black Mountain performances by Rauschenberg, Cage, and Merce Cunningham. Later, artists included Adrian Piper and Vito Acconci. (Piper has of course also written Conceptual texts as well as as volumes of critical theory.)

OTHER MOVEMENTS

Concurrent to conceptual art was the Italian conceptual movement arte povera, so named in 1967 by curator Germano Celant, which included artists like Alighiero Boetti, Mario Merz, and Guilio Paolini.

Many conceptualists like Kaprow, Yoko Ono, and Nam June Paik became involved in the Fluxus movement, influenced by John Cage and Dada.

IS CONCEPTUAL ART DEAD?

Surprising even its most ardent supporters, conceptual art found a place in the art market as early as the 1970s. Many believed that this art-world acceptance and market success equated the end of conceptual art.

Lucy Lippard laments in the postface to Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object, 1966 to 1972: “Hopes that ‘conceptual art’ would be able to avoid the general commercialization, the destructively ‘progressive’ approach of modernism were unfounded. It seemed in 1969 that no one, not even a public greedy for novelty, would actually pay money, or much of it, for a xerox sheet referring to an event past or never directly perceived, a group of photographs documenting  an ephemeral situation or condition, a project for work never to be completed, words spoken but not recorded; it seemed that these artists would therefore be forcibly freed from the tyranny of a commodity status and market-orientation. Three years later, the major conceptualists are selling work for substantial sums here and in Europe.”

Joseph Kosuth also bemoans, “Had we known that its death would have come from acceptance, perhaps many of us would have appreciated (for as long as it continued) that the hostility and extreme defensiveness that marked its public greeting was paradoxically its life support system.”

Conceptual art’s prime years—some say “lifespan”—are generally considered to be 1966-72.  Extensions of the movement included Post-Conceptualism of the ’70s and ’80s (Sherrie Levine),  and Neo-Conceptualism of the ’80s and ’90s (Damien Hirst and the YBAs). Of course, while the original period of the so-called “Conceptual Artists” may be consigned to the history books, countless artists incorporate conceptual approaches into their work today—suggesting that the legacy of movement chronicled by Lippard continues to extend and evolve around the globe.

Matias Faldbakken’s Unorthodox Cardboard Box

Matias Faldbakken’s Unorthodox Cardboard Box

By Artspace Editors

May 21, 2015

Matias Faldbakken’s Unorthodox Cardboard Box

Matias Faldbakken’s Box 1 (2014)

Here’s what you need to know to regale your friends about Matias Faldbakken‘s “Box” series.

1. An artist who proves irresistible to curators, the Norwegian sculptor Matias Faldbakken has built a career out of approaching the physical trappings of our globalized industrial landscape—shipping containers, tie-downs, bags, boxes, etc.—with barely contained violence, rendering them incapable of fulfilling their purposes.

2. This lithograph of a cardboard box (which comes in three different formats) derives from a series of works he exhibited at Paula Cooper Gallery in the spring of 2014, using minimalist techniques to transform the disposable object into a composition in the tradition of the classic monochrome.

3. Working as an acclaimed novelist on the side under the name Abo Rasul, Faldbakken has exhibited his work widely (including at dOCUMENTA 13) and is collected by the Rubells, Jerry Speyer, Eugenio López Alonso, and other prominent connoisseurs; he will be included in this year’s inaugural Vienna Biennale.

4. The artist’s literary output includes a collection of short stories titled Snort Stories (2005), an updating of Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, and a trilogy of novels cumulatively called the “Scandinavian Misanthropy,” the first of which graphically details the day-to-day lives of a family-run pornography production company.

5. Faldbakken is an occassional collaborator of fellow Norwegian artist Gardar Eide Einarsson, and last year the two joined artist Oscar Tuazon to form a supergroup of agressively minimalist installation art for a show at Team Gallery titled “Chez Perv.”

6 Artworks to Invest in This May

6 Artworks to Invest in This May

By Artspace Editors

May 27, 2015

6 Artworks to Invest in This May

A detail of Ed Ruscha’s Cold Beer Beautiful Girls (2009)

From an enigmatic piece by a young breakout star of this year’s Venice Biennale to a classic work by an American art icon, here are gems to tickle the canniest collectors. The following artworks were chosen by Artspace editors in consultation with VIP Client Manager Hannah Flegelman.

ED RUSCHA
Cold Beer Beautiful Girls (2009)
ruscha

Ed Ruscha is the paradigmatic Los Angeles artist, and as that city’s art scene has caught fire (metaphorically—don’t be alarmed) his star has attained unprecedented heights. This month, one of his signature text paintings fetched $4.2 million at Christie’s, and this piece—derived from a 1993 painting sold when the artist was repped by Leo Castelli—has the full-throttle, all-American gusto of his best work. It also happens to be about as L.A. as it gets: when Sofia Coppola wanted to convey rock-star living at the Chateau Marmot in her film Somewhere she propped one of these prints up in the antihero’s hotel room.

PAMELA ROSENKRANZ
Clearer (2014)
pamela

One of the undisputed breakout hits of the current Venice Biennale, Pamela Rosenkranz’s Swiss Pavilion is a deceptively soothing apparition: an airy, light-flooded pink-walled room containing a pool of water colored a similar blushing pink. Sensual and fleshy yet nearly immaterial, the installation (which served as the illustration for the New York Times’s Biennale review) expresses the young artist’s preoccupation with the evanescent physicality of the body. Currently also exhibiting at the Zabludowicz Collection in London and at Kassel’s Fridericianum, Rozenkranz is a bona fide rising star. This subtle piece—containing her signature pink and blue hues—is an excellent place to begin collecting her work.

EL ANATSUI
Variation I_C (2015)
anatsui

Awarded the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement by this year’s Venice Biennale curator, Okwui Enwezor, the Ghanaian-born sculptor El Anatsui has ascended over the past half decade from being the world’s most famous African artist to being one of the most renowned living artists anywhere, full stop. Today his intricate tapestries made from bottle caps and other humble detritus routinely sell on the primary market for over $1 million—a value confirmed on the secondary market by the $1.1 million performance of a 2007 sculpture at Christie’s in May. Now in his early 70s, Anatsui is receiving a victory-lap retrospective at Jack Shainman’s Kinderhook, New York, space The School, with over 40 pieces from across five decades hand-selected by the artist’s longtime dealer. This print is an accessible (and instantly recognizable) example of Anatsui’s work.

CHANTAL JOFFE
Red Head on Ochre (2012)
joffe

The painter Chantal Joffe is one of the boldest stylists in contemporary portraiture, employing a distinctive shorthand approach that seems almost casual—although a longer look reveals links to the sustained, empathic processes of Alice Neel and Lucian Freud. Joffe’s expressive paintings are currently on view at the Jewish Museum in New York, where 30 portraits she made of Jewish women—including Hannah Arendt and the artist’s idol Diane Arbus—have been assembled by the curator Jens Hoffmann. This portrait, of a flame-haired young woman against a striking, mustardy backdrop, exemplifies Joffe’s uncanny way of collapsing the space between the viewer and her subjects.

WAYNE THIEBAUD
Reservoir (2014)
thiebaud

The great American artist Wayne Thiebaud is often too easily understood as the painter of iconic cakes, pies, and other heartland desserts, but his position in the history of his country’s art is far more interesting. His still lifes, influenced by New York Abstract Expressionism (he knew the de Koonings et al. as a young man), predate Pop and in fact are closer to the mute Neo-Dada statements of Jasper Johns. His majestic landscapes, meanwhile, a lesser-known but increasingly coveted body of work, display kinship with the great Bay Area Figurationist Richard Diebenkorn. One of these landscapes, Hill Street (Day City (1981), doubled its low estimate last November to sell at Sotheby’s for $4.9 million—the 94-year-old artist’s second highest price at auction. This large yet delicate landscape in aquatint and drypoint is a captivating example of this body of work.

TSENG KWONG CHI
San Francisco, California (from the series “East Meets West”) (1979/2004)
tseng

Currently the subject of a critically acclaimed survey at New York’s Grey Art Gallery (which you can read about here), the puckish Chinese artist Tseng Kwong Chi created a daring, improbable, and deeply funny career by playing up the difference between his Maoist upbringing and his adopted American home. Although he died in his prime in 1990 (from AIDS-related complications) the artist created a potent and diverse oeuvre, and he stands as one of a generation of Chinese artists who worked in the U.S.—among them Frog King Kwok and Tehching Hsieh—who are garnering new attention as the Chinese art market evolves. This piece from “East Meets West,” his most famous series, is an iconic work by an artist whose reputation is on the rise.

The Revolution Was Televised: Groundbreaking Early Marriages of Art and the Tube

The Revolution Was Televised: Groundbreaking Early Marriages of Art and the Tube

Goldie Hawn in “Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In.” Image provided by The Kobal Collection at Art Resource, New York.

“Mad Men” may have come to an end, but armchair historians have a new opportunity to scrutinize the visual culture of mid-century—this time, from an art lover’s perspective rather than an ad man’s. “Revolution of the Eye: Modern Art and the Birth of American Television,” which recently inaugurated a national tour at New York’s Jewish Museum, looks at the underexplored relationship between early TV and avant-garde art. Placing works by Roy Lichtenstein, Agnes Martin, and Robert Morris alongside snippets of popular broadcasts, it gamely ignores the high/low distinctions that were common in that era (and are still respected, for the most part, by scholars and curators).

The exhibition, with a Sterling Cooper-worthy design led by Pentagram parter J. Abbott Miller, is narrowly focused on the 1950s and ’60s; don’t expect to see slightly later classics of TV art such as Richard Serra’s Television Delivers People (1973) or Dara Birnbaum’s Technology/Transformation: Wonder Woman (1978-9) or more recent attempts to televise the art world (e.g., Bravo’s “Work of Art.”). But the postwar years—the formative years of television, as we know it today—is a fascinating period, full of conflicts and neuroses about art as mass entertainment and the place of television in museums.

Victor D’Amico, who founded the Museum of Modern Art‘s education department in 1937 and led its programming through 1969, once expressed the ambivalence many purveyors of “high culture” felt about the new medium: “That vicious little box sits in everybody’s living room and has taken possession of the minds of America. But television can be used for good as it can bring aesthetic experiences into every classroom, art center, and home.”

During these years, MoMA was embarking on an experimental program called the “MoMA Television Project.” The “Ed Sullivan Show” was bringing Minimalism and Color Field Painting to the masses by way of its ever-changing stage sets. Rod Serling was updating Duchamp and Magritte in his Surrealist-influenced show “The Twilight Zone” and Madison Avenue was mining the Op and Pop movements to sell everything from ice cream to cameras. Artists including John Cage and Allan Kaprow, ignoring the critical hand-wringing about the impoverishment of mass culture by public intellectuals such as Dwight MacDonald and Clement Greenberg, were turning up on popular shows like “I’ve Got a Secret” and “What I Did On My Vacation.”

As the show’s curator, Maurice Berger, writes in the catalog, “the dynamic new medium, with its imperative to experiment and extend the limits of entertainment, paralleled the visual and conceptual dynamism of modern art.”

Below is a critical look at a few highlights from the exhibition (on view in New York through September 27).

ROD SERLING’S “THE TWILIGHT ZONE” (1959-64)

From the spiraling sequence of its most famous opening credits—a direct nod to Duchamp’s Rotoreliefs—Rod Serling’s “The Twilight Zone” was as steeped in Dada and Surrealist art as it was in science fiction. As Berger writes, “The series reverberates… with themes recurrent in Surrealist art—the eyeball, the whirling vortex, the mannequin, the door, the clock.” Dada and Surrealism were already several decades old, of course, but the movements were enjoying a late resurgence in postwar America as younger artists such as Johns and Rauschenberg and film and television professionals discovered the work of Duchamp.

MOMA’S “TELEVISION PROJECT” 

MOMA TVInstallation view of “Revolution of the Eye: Modern Art and the Birth of American Television,” May 1, 2015 –  September 27, 2015. © The Jewish Museum, NY.  Photo by: David Heald

One of the most important points of contact between modern art and television was “The Television Project,” MoMA’s short-lived and deeply conflicted experiment in art programming for TV (it was initiated in 1952 and disbanded three years later).  As part of the project, its codirector Sidney Peterson (an avant-garde filmmaker) came up with a charming children’s television special called The Invisible Moustache of Raoul Dufy (1955). It was co-produced by MoMA and NBC, and animated by the Hollywood studio UPA, but the Modern ultimately withdrew from the project because it did not “further the cause of modern art.” Also rejected was Peterson’s short film Architectural Millinery, which made bemused comparisons between Manhattan rooftops and the hats of passers-by; the museum fretted that it was insufficiently “intellectual.” MoMA would later suppress its anxieties about the marriage of modern art and popular entertainment enough to mount 1962’s “Television U.S.A.,” a survey of programs and commercials, and to establish a Television Archive of the Arts in 1967.

STAN VANDERBEEK, ACHOOO MR. KERROOSCHEV, 1960 

Before he became a pioneer of experimental film, Stan VanDerBeek worked as an animator of the children’s program “Winky Dink and You.” (The interactive show, which encouraged children to draw on plastic screens that could be superimposed on the television, was more progressive than its title may suggest.) VanDerBeek’s early film Achooo Mr. Kerrooschev, a spirited animated short spoofing the Cold War politician, strikes out in a slightly more grown-up direction.

KODAK INSTAMATIC COMMERCIAL, 1965

In the mid-1960s, Op Art was on the vanguard of art and design—and Madison Avenue was quick to coopt it. This commercial for the Kodak Instamatic, made the year of the now-infamous MoMA show “The Responsive Eye,” plunges the viewer into a dizzying dance party that could be seen as a more sanitized version of one of Yayoi Kusama’s orgiastic happenings. Fresh-faced men and women do the watusi in a disco with black-and-white patterned walls and floors á la Victor Vasarely as a suave photographer records the scene with glinting flashcubes.

“POP GOES THE JOKER,” 1967 

Long before Homer Simpson became an outsider artist, the creators of the 1960s “Batman” television series were skewering art-world characters and conventions. In the episode “Pop Goes the Joker,” the villain is a conceptual-art provocateur who spray-paints museum masterpieces and wins an “international art contest” with a nearly blank canvas. All the enfant-terrible clichés are here: paintings are made with feet, Gutai-style, and by monkeys hurling fruit. As one might expect from this high-camp series, there’s even a nod to Warhol: the Joker’s patron is named Baby Jane Towser, after collector and Factory star Baby Jane Holzer.

ANDY WARHOL’S THE UNDERGROUND SUNDAE, 1968

Warhol SundaeWarhol, still from The Underground Sundae, TV ad for Schrafft’s Ice Cream, 1968. Kramlich Collection, San Francisco

Warhol, not surprisingly, gets his own gallery in the exhibition. It contains a mix of TV appearances, the 1965 film Outer and Inner Space, and the artist’s early graphic designs for CBS and TV Guide, along with a liberal sprinkling of relevant quotes (“A whole day of life is like a whole day of television.”) Also exhibited is this trippy commercial he made for Schrafft’s Ice Cream, which layers a melting sundae with a massive maraschino cherry over a background of TV color bars. Warhol film stars Joe D’Allesandro and Viva were part of the shoot, but were edited out (presumably for decency, as both were reportedly shirtless). What’s left is a kind of edible lava lamp, a wholesome dessert with just a hint of countercultural flavor.

“THE MEDIUM IS THE MEDIUM,” WBGH-TV, 1969

As the exhibition approaches the 1970s, it acknowledges the blurring of art-for-television with the then-nascent medium of video art. The two categories merge in “The Medium Is the Medium,” a program that aired on the Boston public television station WGBH in 1969. Consisting of commissioned works by Allan Kaprow, Otto Piene, Nam June Paik, James Seawright, Thomas Tadlock, and Aldo Tambellini, it finds these artists fiddling with the TV’s inner workings (with some assistance from expert technicians). Paik’s Electronic Opera #1 [not included in the excerpts at the museum] plays with color saturation and distortion; Kaprow’s contribution, Hello, shows people communicating with each other across multiple monitors in various locations in a kind of primitive Skype.

Robert De Niro addresses the class of 2015- a good read and chuckle

Dave Bidini: Insufferable for your art

Dave Bidini | May 29, 2015 | Last Updated: May 29 10:23 AM ET
More from Dave Bidini | @hockeyesque

Actor Robert De Niro addresses the class of 2015, faculty, and guests during  New York University's Tisch School of the Arts commencement  ceremony

AP Photo/Mary AltafferActor Robert De Niro addresses the class of 2015, faculty, and guests during New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts commencement ceremony
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Last week Robert DeNiro addressed the student body at NYU Tisch School  of the Arts  He said:  You made it. And you’re f–ked.” The brilliant, esteemed New York actor failed to elaborate, exactly, the nature of the students’ f–kedness. He went on to talk about choices, and the (artistic) passion that clouds the common sense needed to make practical ones. But his first sentiment — which inelegantly expressed the sense of doom that surrounds an artist’s life — was typical of the kind of thing that older generations say to younger generations so that younger generations will feel incapable of experiencing the kind of life that people like DeNiro have lived. He could have told them other things. He could have told them not to make the same mistakes as him, and to learn from the dubious career path by which he has succumbed.

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Robert DeNiro could have told the kids not to make awful movies after establishing himself as one of our great living actors. He could have told them not to trust Hollywood, because Hollywood has suckered him into Meet the Fockers and Little Fockers and Meet the Parents and Grudge Match and The Score. He could have told them that just because you are good and legendary and you can write your own ticket, you shouldn’t settle for anything less. He could have told them to push and push and push to create great art even when money calls you forward. He could have told them to resist fame and the lure of being in the public eye. He could have told them that making a great film will last beyond any absurd commercial box office smash. He could have told them to remember what made you — fearlessness, devotion to craft, the love of art — and to never betray that, no matter how big the director or how powerful the studio. He could have told them to observe these mistakes, and feed off of them. He could have told them anything other than, “You’re f–ked.”

Robert De Niro could have told the kids not to make awful movies after establishing himself as one of our great living actors

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Before Bill Cosby was outed as a predator, he told director Melvin Van Peebles an instructive and important thing: “In order to achieve your dream, you have to wake up from your dream.” Great artists have to know what to find before they can ever find it. Neil Young might have seemed like a wandering hippie, but he dreamed up “Rust Never Sleeps” in a single moment, and, months later, was staging a trans-continental tour. Bob Dylan was the same — the regenesis of Woody Guthrie in modern times — and so are Rush. The idea for their new tour was conceived in a flash, and awhile later, it hit the road. Great artists know that the pursuit will hurt, and some won’t ever recover; we lose art, and artists, every day. Some become lawyers and some become accountants, and this is something DeNiro also mentioned in his speech. But my dad was an accountant and he raised two artists as kids. I was probably less f–ked because he had a job and a life and a career. Maybe that’s something  DeNiro could have told the kids: Your parents. Their support. Don’t be ashamed and don’t mortgage their goodwill to pretend to be someone you aren’t.

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I wish DeNiro had said: Don’t make bad movies if you can help it. Aspire to be a new creation every time. Try to claw against the shell that hardens around you as you age and point the way forward even as you grow grey and bearded and infirm, telling the kids: “Follow me.” The older generation has a duty to show the younger generation what it’s like to be an aging artist — aging artists are successful artists because it means they’re still doing it — and to show them how the world looks from here. DeNiro could have evoked the words of musician Nick Lowe, who said: “I want kids to come to my show and say, ‘Man, I can’t wait to get old.’ A life in art isn’t about being f–ked. It’s about continuing to be f–ked and f–ked and f–ked while riding into the great and beautiful evermore.

Wealthy investors dabble in art investment funds These funds provide a shot at partial ownership at the Grand Masters.

Art investment funds are a bit like the Wild West. They’re unpredictable, largely unregulated and dominated by speculators. Still a tiny fraction of the overall fund market—a $1.3 billion niche—the sector has been getting attention by the well-heeled from all parts of the world.

Such funds, which are structured like hedge funds and marketed exclusively to the very rich, pool investor capital to buy and sell fine art. Managed by a professional manager or advisory firm, they seek to deliver returns through the appreciation and ultimate sale of their underlying assets, which includes paintings, sculpture, photography, video or print.

Some art investment funds focus on investing in art from a certain region, a particular style period as well as a specific medium.

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Fund managers must be diligent at trend and market analysis—tracking auction houses, curators and galleries—since their role is to predict when a certain work will peak in value in order to sell for a profit.

View of the sculpture 'Pensive Woman' (1913/14) by German sculptor Wilhelm Lehmbruck during a press preview of the ImEx (Impressionism, Expressionism) exhibition at Berlin's Alte Nationalgalerie (Old National Gallery) on May 20, 2015.

John Macdougall | AFP | Getty Images
View of the sculpture ‘Pensive Woman’ (1913/14) by German sculptor Wilhelm Lehmbruck during a press preview of the ImEx (Impressionism, Expressionism) exhibition at Berlin’s Alte Nationalgalerie (Old National Gallery) on May 20, 2015.

Art funds hold growing appeal to those who have enjoyed a net-worth surge and are looking for ways to diversify their portfolios, especially in new growth markets such as Asia, the Middle East and Latin America. They can carry a high price tag. London’s The Fine Art Fund Group, the largest player in the market, with more than $500 million in assets under contract, requires a minimum investment of $500,000 to $1 million.

Where individual works by the most important artists are increasingly out of reach, art funds provide a means of entry— and a shot at partial ownership.

The series of funds managed by The Fine Art Fund Group allows investors to borrow works of art from the fund and hang them in their homes and offices.

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Based on assets sold and the estimated value of works that have not yet been sold, fund founder and CEO Philip Hoffman said his funds have produced an average return of 9 percent before fees. (Most art funds, including those offered by The Fine Art Fund Group, charge a 1 percent to 3 percent management fee, plus a 20 percent cut of profits. The Fine Art Fund Group collects its share only after clients have earned at least 6 percent.)

“We have seen huge interest from clients who are interested in having their eggs in 20 baskets as opposed to three,” said Hoffman, noting most of his clients allocate roughly 5 percent of their wealth to art, but some allocate 20 percent or more. “After 2008, investors got burned [by being underdiversified], so they are delving in with smaller amounts to start with.”

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None of its funds are open to new investors.

In its 2014 Art & Finance report, Deloitte Luxembourg and market research firm ArtTactic found that 76 percent of art buyers and collectors were acquiring art and collectibles for investment purposes, up dramatically from 53 percent in 2012.

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At the same time, some 88 percent of family offices and 64 percent of the private banks surveyed said estate planning around art and collectibles is a strategic focus in the coming 12 months. Roughly half of the family offices surveyed also indicated that one of the most important motivations for including art and collectibles in their service offering was the potential role it could play in a balanced portfolio and asset diversification strategy.

Indeed, multimillionaires have a disproportionately high allocation to cash, according to a 2014 survey by U.S. Trust, which found 60 percent of those with at least $3 million in investable assets held between 10 percent and 25 percent of their money in cash.

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While all art funds utilize a traditional “buy and hold” strategy, individual funds differ in their size, duration, investment focus, investment strategies and portfolio restrictions, according to the Art Fund Association. Most charge 1 percent to 3 percent of assets in annual management fees and take a cut of profits at the end of the fund’s life, some as much as 20 percent.

Apart from The Fine Art Fund Group, the largest art funds globally include The Collectors Fund in Kansas City, Missouri, which reports an 8.3 percent internal rate of return since its inception in 2007, and Artemundi Global Fund in London.

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Artemundi reports its book value per share has grown from an initial value of $500 in 2009 to nearly $950 at the end of 2014, an accumulated 90 percent return. (Book value is an accounting term that refers to the value of the shares if the company were to liquidate its assets and pay off all its debt obligations.) The real return per share will only be attained at the end of the fund’s life.

How art funds work

By design, art funds allow only a small number of “accredited” (wealthy) investors to purchase shares, which ensures they are not subject to the same regulatory oversight as stocks, bonds and mutual funds.

Proponents suggest the lack of regulation, deficient price discovery mechanisms, non-transparency of the market, subjective value and illiquid nature of fine art enables them to generate arbitrage opportunities that seasoned art professionals can exploit for the benefit of their investors.

Read MoreThese hot funds are leaving the S&P in the dust

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They note, too, that as a non-correlated asset class, art provides portfolio diversification benefits, stores value and can help hedge inflation.

Ironically, though, it’s the lack of transparency that has also been the art fund industry’s undoing over the last 12 months.

To protect investors from unrealistic promises of double-digit returns on the resale of artworks by some funds, France, China and the U.K. have all imposed stricter regulations on unregulated collective investment schemes.

A shakeout under way

The 2014 Art & Finance report indicated that such measures have created a temporary crisis of confidence among would-be investors, especially in China, which, due to its size and appetite for tangible assets, serves as a bellwether for the global art fund market.

Assets under management in art funds have declined nearly 40 percent to an estimated $1.3 billion since 2012, according to the report.

As of last summer, 72 art funds existed globally, with 55 in China and the remainder based in either Europe or the U.S. By comparison, art funds totaled 115 in 2012—a record, when 90 such funds were open in China.

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“The Chinese government is putting the clamp down and trying in a more robust way to regulate the shadow-banking system, which has had the effect of contraction in the art fund space,” said Evan Beard, head of Deloitte’s U.S. art and finance group. Shadow banking refers to the network of informal lenders, such as trust companies, leasing firms, and money market funds that lend to riskier projects where conventional lenders will not.

Over the long term, however, the current contraction brought on by tighter oversight could be positive for investors, he said.

Know the risks

“When you start commoditizing art, people start to think they can do it on a large scale and be successful, but there’s a lot of risk.” -Kemp Stickney, chief fiduciary officer, Wilmington Trust

“If China can maintain their growth story, if their regulatory environment allows for these trust structures and if the infrastructure continues to develop on this path, I think you’ll see continued growth in this space in China, which because of its size could fuel the art fund market,” said Beard.

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In the meantime, wealthy investors who are looking to diversify their portfolio amid the stock market’s soaring returns must decide if art, or art funds, provide value in their portfolios.

“We don’t promulgate a certain percentage of assets being in art,” said Kemp Stickney, head of family wealth and chief fiduciary officer fo