Terms to think/talk about your and all art

I already posted about the Art Genome Project months ago. I post here information,
not because I think it is absolute truth carved in stone, but consider it to be a useful and
handy tool to think and talk about art, one’s own and all art.

Wikipedia says about it –
The Art Genome Project is the search technology behind Artsy.

The Art Genome Project’s search technology is the product of an ongoing art-historical study—undertaken by a team of contributors with art-historical backgrounds at Artsy—seeking to define the characteristics which distinguish and connect works of art, architecture, ancient artifacts and design.[1]

Its primary aim is to provide Artsy users dynamic search categories and explain similarities among art and artists. Currently, there are 1000+ “genes” (i.e. attributes of art) in the project’s taxonomy, including art-historical movements, subject matter, and formal qualities.[2][3] These genes are the product of Artsy’s team and their engagement with (and feedback from) the museums, galleries, curators, critics and art historians present on Artsy’s platform.

There are two general parts of the project: 1) Conceiving and defining such characteristics, referred to as “genes,” and 2) Applying these genes to artists and artworks—creating “genomes” for both—for the artsy.net [4] site.

Importantly, unlike tags, which are binary, genes are applied with values ranging from 0 to 100.[5][6] The value indicates the degree of relevance of a gene to an artist or work of art. While not seen by users, such gene values account for the strength of a relationship between artists and artworks. It also enables similarity to be expressed in a more nuanced way[7] than it might be with just tags because one can weigh various attributes of an artist or work of art to establish which might be the most or less important. Furthermore, such nuance allows for matching potential collectors with artworks based on their tastes and preferences.[8][9]

Artsy’s “genes” create various opportunities for discovering and learning about the artist and artworks. If users search for an artist, they can see “related” artists and if they search for an artwork, they can see “related” artworks. Genes (with definitions) also appear on their own pages and provide the backbone for Artsy’s Browse page.

The Art Genome Project provides metadata for search (and similarity) results based on the principles of information retrieval (TF/IDF) and presents results in a UX-driven search product.

Matthew Israel, an art historian, is the Director of The Art Genome Project.[10]
The Art Genome Project and Other Taxonomies for Artwork

Art historians, libraries and image archives have long used classification systems, art cataloging standards or metadata, and created taxonomies, such as The Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus[15] to systematize the description of artworks. Classification is one of the major foundations of the discipline of art history.[16]

Most college and university art history surveys are based on such an idea of classification, to provide students with a way of grasping the history of art and a jumping-off point for more focused research. Unlike other types of classification, The Art Genome’s taxonomy was designed for the purposes of establishing similarities between artists and artworks.[17]
Genes versus Tags

In the words of Matthew Israel, Director of The Art Genome Project, “Genes are not tags — though we have many tags on the site — because tags are binary (something is either tagged “dog” or not). Genes, in contrast, can range from 0-100, thus capturing how strongly a gene applies to a specific artist or artwork. This nuanced connection between works of art is impossible with a simple tagging mechanism.”[18]

Importantly, The Art Genome Project does incorporate over 6000 tags for content (iconography) in artwork as well as certain materials and mediums, which do not need the nuance of genes.[19]

https://www.artsy.net/categories

The Art Genome Project is the classification system and technological framework that powers Artsy. It maps the characteristics (we call them “genes”) that connect artists, artworks, architecture, and design objects across history. There are currently over 1,000 characteristics in The Art Genome Project, including art historical movements, subject matter, and formal qualities. Read articles by The Art Genome Project, or explore our categories below.

Featured Categories
https://www.artsy.net/gene/spaces-of-the-art-world
https://www.artsy.net/gene/the-fantastic

Subject Matter

Political

Political

Landscape

Landscape

Humor

Humor

Scenes of Everyday Life

Scenes of Everyday Life

Fashion

Fashion

Cityscape

Cityscape

Animals

Animals

Americana

Americana

Still Life

Still Life

Portraiture

Medium/Technique

Performance

Performance

Ceramic

Ceramic

Design

Design

Painting

Painting

Photography

Photography

Film/Video

Film/Video

Work on Paper

Work on Paper

Collage

Collage

Sculpture

Sculpture

Architecture

Style and Movement

Pop Art

Pop Art

Abstract Expressionism

Abstract Expressionism

Young British Artists (YBA)

Young British Artists (YBA)

Minimalism

Minimalism

Conceptual Art

Conceptual Art

Surrealism

Surrealism

Cubism

Cubism

Old Masters

Old Masters

'85 New Wave

’85 New Wave

The Pictures Generation

Geographic Regions

South Asia

South Asia

Latin America and The Caribbean

Latin America and The Caribbean

Australia and New Zealand

Australia and New Zealand

Eastern Europe

Eastern Europe

China

China

Southeast Asia

Southeast Asia

United States

United States

Africa

Africa

Middle East

Middle East

Western Europe

All Categories A–Z

C
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